Continuous delivery epub

 

    Download Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases Through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Addison-Wesley Signature. Contribute to aaquresh/CITraining development by creating an account on GitHub. A curated collection of free DevOps related eBooks - ber5ien/Free-DevOps- Books

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    Continuous Delivery Epub

    Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation ( Adobe Reader). Continuous Delivery (eBook, ePUB) - Farley, David; Humble, Jez. Continuous Integration, Delivery, and Deployment, Sander Rossel, Packt Publishing. Des milliers de livres avec la livraison chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin. [PDF] Download Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Addison-Wesley.

    He showed me around his project and one of the interesting aspects of his highly disciplined team was the fact that they deployed their software into production every night. This regular deployment gave them many advantages: written software wasn't waiting uselessly before it was used, they could respond quickly to problems and opportunities, and the rapid turn-around led to a much deeper relationship between them, their business customer, and their final customers. In the last decade I've worked at ThoughtWorks and a common theme of our projects has been reducing that cycle time between idea and usable software. I see plenty of project stories and they almost all involve a determined shortening of that cycle. While we don't usually do daily deliveries into production, it's now common to see teams doing bi-weekly releases. Dave and Jez have been part of that sea-change, actively involved in projects that have built a culture of frequent, reliable deliveries. They and our colleagues have taken organizations that struggled to deploy software once a year, into the world of Continuous Delivery, where releasing becomes routine. The foundation for the approach, at least for the development team, is Continuous Integration CI. CI keeps a development team in sync with each other, removing the delays due to integration issues. A couple of years ago Paul Duvall wrote the book on CI within this series. But CI is just the first step. Software that's been successfully integrated into a mainline code stream still isn't software that's out in production doing its job.

    We achieve all this by ensuring our code is always in a deployable state, even in the face of teams of thousands of developers making changes on a daily basis.

    Belmont Jean-Marcel. Hands-On Continuous Integration and Delivery [EPUB] - Все для студента

    Why continuous delivery? It is often assumed that if we want to deploy software more frequently, we must accept lower levels of stability and reliability in our systems. In fact, peer-reviewed research shows that this is not the case—high performance teams consistently deliver services faster and more reliably than their low performing competition.

    This is true even in highly regulated domains such as financial services and government. This capability provides an incredible competitive advantage for organizations that are willing to invest the effort to pursue it. The practices at the heart of continuous delivery help us achieve several important benefits: Low risk releases. The primary goal of continuous delivery is to make software deployments painless, low-risk events that can be performed at any time, on demand.

    By applying patterns such as blue-green deployments it is relatively straightforward to achieve zero-downtime deployments that are undetectable to users. Faster time to market.

    When teams work together to automate the build and deployment, environment provisioning, and regression testing processes, developers can incorporate integration and regression testing into their daily work and completely remove these phases. We also avoid the large amounts of re-work that plague the phased approach.

    Higher quality. When developers have automated tools that discover regressions within minutes, teams are freed to focus their effort on user research and higher level testing activities such as exploratory testing, usability testing, and performance and security testing.

    While we don't usually do daily deliveries into production, it's now common to see teams doing bi-weekly releases. Dave and Jez have been part of that sea-change, actively involved in projects that have built a culture of frequent, reliable deliveries.

    Continuous Delivery

    They and our colleagues have taken organizations that struggled to deploy software once a year, into the world of Continuous Delivery, where releasing becomes routine. The foundation for the approach, at least for the development team, is Continuous Integration CI. CI keeps a development team in sync with each other, removing the delays due to integration issues.

    A couple of years ago Paul Duvall wrote the book on CI within this series. But CI is just the first step.

    Software that's been successfully integrated into a mainline code stream still isn't software that's out in production doing its job. Dave and Jez's book pick up the story from CI to deal with that 'last mile', describing how to build the deployment pipelines that turn integrated code into production software.

    This kind of delivery thinking has long been a forgotten corner of software development, falling into a hole between developers and operations teams.

    So it's no surprise that the techniques in this book rest upon bringing these teams together, a harbinger of the nascent but growing "devops" movement. This process also involves testers, as testing is a key element of ensuring error-free releases.