Journey to joburg book

 

    Their mother lives and works miles away in Johannesburg. This book is about their trip to Jo'burg to rescue their sister. They go through all these obsticales. Thirteen-year-old Naledi lives with Nono (her grandmother), Tiro (her brother), and Dineo (her baby sister) in a small South African village kilometers from Johannesburg. After her father's death, her mother, Mma, has had to work in Johannesburg for money for the family. Book 1 of 2 in the Journey to Jo'Burg Series . of the sufferings of South Africa's black children brings renewed point to Beverley Naidoo's Journey to Joburg.

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    Journey To Joburg Book

    Mma lives and works in Johannesburg, far from the village thirteen-year-old Naledi and her Enlarge Book Cover · Left hand banner -. Journey to Jo'burg. When Journey to Jo'burg was published in , the book received critical Naledi decides that she and Tiro should walk to Johannesburg and find Mma. Journey to Jo'Burg by Beverley Naidoo, , available at Book Tiro run away from their grandmother to Johannesburg to find their mother, who.

    Shelves: africa , young-adult If you have read The Help, this is an equivalent book for children. The period is South Africa's apartheid years, and while I'm rating four for writing, I'm rating another star for the depiction of tendencies towards popular activism and bringing about change. I also like that there is a simple map. Two kids see their little sister getting very ill but the lady who cares for them doesn't have money for a hospital. So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and If you have read The Help, this is an equivalent book for children. So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and nanny in the big city, Johannesburg. On the way they learn that the white rulers have decided to pass laws that children can't live with their parents who work in cities; that workers must carry a pass; that children are kept from school to pick oranges, and not allowed to eat the fruit; that black children are taught rubbish in school, such as how to write letters seeking employment as servants. They have to board a different bus to whites, use a different hospital and more. The main worry of course, is whether they can find their mother; after that, can they save their sister? The author was a white girl who knew she would have suffered under Nazi Germany, but just did not realise how her black servants had to live. Once she did realise she wrote this book to show the world and promote change from youth upwards. While now dated it's worth a read and worth giving to a child.

    The next day, the children meet with Mma and ride the train back to their home village, telling her all about their journey and what they have learned.

    After arriving back at the village, Mma and Naledi take Dineo to the hospital with borrowed money. But there is only one doctor, and lines to see him are hours long. One child even dies while waiting to see the doctor, causing Naledi to fear for Dineo's life. Eventually, the doctor says Dineo must stay at the hospital, and for three days the family waits.

    On the third day, Mma returns to the hospital to get Dineo, and the family is relieved when Dineo comes home weak but getting better. We learn that Dineo needs milk, fruits, and vegetables to stay healthy and strong, and Mma wonders where she will find the money to get them.

    I know this story sounds a bit sad, but the book ends in a very hopeful tone. As Mma is preparing to go back to Jo'burg, Naledi is happy that she was able to save her sister's life and for all that she learned on her journey. Her eyes are now open to the reality of her world. She plans to find others who share her anger at the way things are and work hard to fulfill her dream: To unlock this lesson you must be a Study. Create your account. Already a member?

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    Journey to Jo'burg: A South African Story

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    Find a degree that fits your goals. Try it risk-free for 30 days. Jason Brunken Jason is a certified teacher with a Masters in Educational Technology and over 12 years of classroom teaching experience. Add to Add to Add to. Want to watch this again later? The book follows a young girl named Naledi and her younger brother, Tiro, on a journey that not only saves their family, but also opens their eyes to nature of their world.

    Characters and Setting From South Africa made racial segregation the law of the land through a series of rules and regulations known as Apartheid. This is a map of South Africa. You can see Johannesburg just southeast of Pretoria. Beginning and Exciting Force What would you do if your little sister was so sick she could not eat or drink? Rising Action Can you imagine trying to walk miles? Signs like this appeared everywhere in South Africa during Apartheid to label the places meant for white people only and those reserved for non-whites.

    Try it risk-free No obligation, cancel anytime. Want to learn more? Select a subject to preview related courses: Climax and Resolution After arriving back at the village, Mma and Naledi take Dineo to the hospital with borrowed money. Ending I know this story sounds a bit sad, but the book ends in a very hopeful tone. Journey to Joburg ends with Naledi being hopeful for the future. I also like that there is a simple map. Two kids see their little sister getting very ill but the lady who cares for them doesn't have money for a hospital.

    So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and If you have read The Help, this is an equivalent book for children. So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and nanny in the big city, Johannesburg.

    On the way they learn that the white rulers have decided to pass laws that children can't live with their parents who work in cities; that workers must carry a pass; that children are kept from school to pick oranges, and not allowed to eat the fruit; that black children are taught rubbish in school, such as how to write letters seeking employment as servants.

    They have to board a different bus to whites, use a different hospital and more.

    The main worry of course, is whether they can find their mother; after that, can they save their sister? The author was a white girl who knew she would have suffered under Nazi Germany, but just did not realise how her black servants had to live.

    Once she did realise she wrote this book to show the world and promote change from youth upwards. While now dated it's worth a read and worth giving to a child. Be prepared for some long conversations, so parents might want to do some background reading too. The tale is simply told and should suit anyone aged from nine or ten. I really enjoyed reading this moving story by Beverley Naidoo. Set against the dangerous landscape of Apartheid South Africa, Journey to Jo'burg is an inspiring story of two young courageous children, a brother and sister called Naledi and Tiro.

    Journey to Jo'Burg : A South African Story

    The story follows their journey from their small village in South Africa to Jo'burg, about miles away, in search of their mother. Their younger sister, Dineo, is very ill and Naledi decides that they need to travel to Jo'burg to bring their mother ba I really enjoyed reading this moving story by Beverley Naidoo. Their younger sister, Dineo, is very ill and Naledi decides that they need to travel to Jo'burg to bring their mother back home in order to save their sister.

    The story highlights the dangers and adventures the children encounter along the way and the challenges they face in South Africa at the time. As well as clear character descriptions and vivid imagery, there are many themes running through the story as it deals with racism and prejudice along with family, love and determination.

    It is a simple story line that has potential to open many discussions and topics for children to further explore in the classroom. I think it is a great read for a KS2 class and there are many activities in which it can be used throughout literacy lessons such as looking at characters in depth, retelling a story from a character's point of view, play scripts and report writing.

    Reading the class reader for year 6, this is a good book to start the conversation on what segregation is and to help kids to be deeper thinkers - i think the teacher says for them to be introspective.

    This was a banned book in SA a while back.. Mar 04, Jenni McReddie rated it really liked it Shelves: Touching story of how two courageous children make an incredible journey during the terrifying apartheid in South Africa. Very short story, but has so much potential for further learning. View 1 comment. Aug 01, Erin Reilly-Sanders rated it liked it Shelves: While this short little novel was an interesting peak into living conditions in South Africa, I found it to be a little didactic.

    The story seemed somewhat unbelievable, as if the author wanted to show us about South Africa and this was simply the method she chose to use. The lack of consideration for how to get home again and the costs of eating and lodging in the city is maybe explained by the country upbringing of the children, but the story also suggests that the hospital was so outrageously While this short little novel was an interesting peak into living conditions in South Africa, I found it to be a little didactic.

    The lack of consideration for how to get home again and the costs of eating and lodging in the city is maybe explained by the country upbringing of the children, but the story also suggests that the hospital was so outrageously expensive that here was not really anything the mother could do if she returned, expect to be there with her child before she died.

    The encounters with other characters arranged and too convenient, although it Nov 21, Imogen Walker rated it it was amazing. I read this book to my year 4 class whilst on my second year placement. Our topic for the term was the Apartheid, this book was great as it helped give the children a better understanding, as well as it being about young children in that time, therefore more meaningful for them.

    Great book. Jun 07, Belinda rated it really liked it. Apr 03, Laura Krooswyk rated it really liked it. This book gives the reader a small taste of what apartheid was like in South Africa!

    Apr 14, Sarah Lee rated it it was ok. Such an important book about a moment in African history. Amazing how times have changed - when I was first teaching this was definitely a KS3 book. Now, and rightly, it's being taught in KS2. Mar 24, Shel rated it liked it Shelves: Naidoo, B. A South African Story. New York: While on their journey the children are helped by several other black people Naidoo, B. While on their journey the children are helped by several other black people along the way, but are cautioned about the rules of apartheid that are strictly enforced in the city.

    They also are exposed to the class and power relations and learn of the hope and rebellions for social change, most notably the Soweto Uprising of While the narrative is both short and fast-paced there are some plot holes.

    For example, at the very beginning of the story, Naledi and Tiro decide that because they would get in trouble for asking for money to pay for a telegram, they should walk to Johannesburg, a city over kilometers away. Published during the height of Apartheid in the mids, this book was banned in South Africa until This would be a wonderful book to use to help students think globally about issues of power and class.

    It could also be the basis for doing a comparison between Apartheid and segregation in the U. Activities to do with the book: Similar themes include class divisions by race, segregation and apartheid, police abuse and brutality, the fight for civil rights, protests, etc. It could specifically trigger a lesson on protests like the Soweto Uprising, in which students protested the structurally racist and oppressive education system and were killed.

    Favorite Quotes: When our buses are full, their buses are half empty. Image how useful it would be if she became a doctor, especially in their own village. She could even look after her own family. On their journey they experience the oppressive and harsh realities of the apartheid including the segregation by colour, the Pass laws that require all black people to carry a passbook at all times and the extreme poverty alongside so much wealth.

    On their journey, the children also experience kindness, bravery and hope. Through meeting Grace they learn about the struggle against the unfair system of the apartheid and the uprising of students against the treatment of black people.

    It inspires Naledi to want to share her story and whilst, raising poignant questions regarding the brutal and controlling system of government, the novel ends on a hopeful note that things can perhaps change. I read this book with my year 5 class in a multicultural school, who were shocked and amazed that such discrimination against people based on race happened so recently.

    It has prompted some lively discussions as well as provided a strong platform for engaging literacy lessons and cross curricular activities for half a term.

    The story is incredibly moving and also beautifully written. It has been a great inspiration for teaching children to use subordinate clauses and using setting to convey emotions.

    We have used it as a basis for topic work - dressed the room and created an impressive visual display, studied South Africa including its geographical features and compared them with the features of England. The children have created stories and monologues from the perspective of the main characters and then performed these to create podcasts.

    We have undertaken role play and the children have written their own endings to the story. Don't underestimate this short and easy read.

    I actually almost have up on it because this first time I tried reading it I got confused by the characters and went to sleep! I tried again tonight and I read the whole thing in one sitting!

    What's great about this book is that on the surface it's a simple story. A couple of black South African kids travel to the city in search of their mom because their younger sister is sick. Seems simple enough, right?

    The Book Trail Journey to Jo'burg - The Book Trail

    Well, you get to know and begin to care about Don't underestimate this short and easy read. Well, you get to know and begin to care about the two kids quickly. After a series of adventures, they end up finding their mom and return to the village.

    Together they manage to get medical help for their sister. On the surface it's a simple story. In reality, if you dig deeper, you will learn that this was a journey of self-discovery and awareness for them.

    They learned firsthand about apartheid because in Johannesburg they experienced it! They finally saw what their mother's job is like. They accidentally got on the white bus and were yelled at and were told they were stupid. They meet a girl who introduced them to the idea of freedom. They realized that there is a lot about South Africa that they don't know, which their schools are not teaching them.

    It's a beautiful story. It won't be an easy read for kids to understand because in order to really get it kids will need to have some background on South Africa. It might be hard, at first, for them to keep the characters straight, since I even struggled with that as an adult.

    But it's worth all the extra work because the story has so much depth and complexity and kids will enjoy learning and talking about this. It is much more relevant than we think. Sep 23, zabarj rated it really liked it Shelves: A short, but engrossing journey of two siblings Naledi and Tiro, who journey from Johannesburg to Jo'Burg because their baby sister has become very ill.

    In Jo'Burg, they find their mother, who works for a white family. The main worry of course, is whether they can find their mother; after that, can they save their sister? The author was a white girl who knew she would have suffered under Nazi Germany, but just did not realise how her black servants had to live.

    Once she did realise she wrote this book to show the world and promote change from youth upwards. While now dated it's worth a read and worth giving to a child. Be prepared for some long conversations, so parents might want to do some background reading too. The tale is simply told and should suit anyone aged from nine or ten. Set against the dangerous landscape of Apartheid South Africa, Journey to Jo'burg is an inspiring story of two young courageous children, a brother and sister called Naledi and Tiro.

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